The recent campus closures due to the rash of illnesses was a very difficult, albeit necessary, measure. It was hard on our students for its impact on interactions and activities, on our parents for the changing of schedules, on our teachers for adjusting all their lesson plans, and for the many who were ill and those taking care of them. It was a hardship we do not wish to repeat. But, what a joy it was when everyone came back after a week away! In fact, it felt a little bit odd, like we were returning from Christmas break. Yet students and faculty alike returned with enthusiasm; smiles filled the hallways and classrooms.

This feeling was especially true among our high school volleyball players. They were so excited and filled with such expectation to get back in the game. They had worked hard this season building skills and stamina, formed a team, followed a plan, and pursued a goal. There was so much joy as they got back on track to finish the season and in the company of friends. When I saw them return to the court, even just to practice, there was something very sweet and special about it.

As a Classical educator, I love sports. When we view school through the lens of our Christian heritage, as we do in a Classical school, we routinely see that there is more to an education than academic studies. It is not merely about filling minds or applying some method. Instead, “classical” means a kind of education, consistent with a Christian worldview and refined over centuries, that regards the whole child as a creation of God and teaches students how to be more fully human and reflect the glory of their Creator. That is why we integrate instruction on the students’ character, attitudes, habits, and the things they love and pursue. And participation in sports contributes to this intellectual, social, and spiritual maturation in a meaningful way.

Of course, we can say this of many other things we do in the school: choir, band, art, field trips, dances, competitions, rocket launches (4th & 5th Grades!), and the core of our academic instruction. All of these activities are under the instruction of Christ-followers and directed toward the development of a whole person, one who is educated, equipped, and empowered to find his or her purpose in Christ. Such a lofty goal can only be accomplished well in the context of community—the partnership of parents, teachers, administrators, coaches, custodial staff, pastors, and friends who love them and guide them toward a life filled with joy and purpose. That is why I am so pleased to be back in school and part of this community. There is something very sweet and special about it.

Soli Deo Gloria (to God be the Glory),
Stephen Sprague
Head of School